The purpose of this research is to reflects and analyse the poignant reality of the Magdalene Laundries and Mother and Baby Homes in Ireland during the 20th century. This paper reflects events that for decades were hidden, during a period in which Ireland was oppressed by the doctrine followed by some members of the Catholic church. A section of it is dedicated to the testimonies and reactions of the survivors, highlighting the importance of the help they received from their allies. In particular the interviews I conducted were with people from four different southern communities of Ireland: counties Galway, Kerry, Dublin, and Cork. Both Magdalene Laundries and Mother and Baby Homes are part of Irish memory, but what kind of memory? How from religious institutions designed to ‘help women and children’, have they turned into asylums? Why has the Irish government in modern times apologized and expressed shame for certain past events? Many are the questions to be asked in order to discover 'territories' that for decades were unexplored. In this paper I will try to answer to some of these queries, by giving voices to survivors, who were not allowed or did not want to share their stories in the past, but who are now ready to talk with no fear. It also introduces the voices of the ‘allies’, people who through their work, support the women and children who spent part of their life in one of the two asylums. The borders I am focusing on are a mix of political, social and cultural: in particular I focus on how, through social and political activity, many survivors, together with their allies, crossed and are crossing the imaginary boundary of silence, by sharing their stories and testimonies. Key words: Magdalene Laundries, Mother and Baby Homes, Ireland, Memories, Voices.
Credits
Featured Image by Finnegan, F.: Do Penance or Perish
Carlotta Fioretti
I want to integrate into the history of Ireland minority voices that have been suppressed for decades.

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